Magazine editor – Didgeridoo Magazin http://didgeridoomagazin.com/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 01:52:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-4-150x150.png Magazine editor – Didgeridoo Magazin http://didgeridoomagazin.com/ 32 32 Christopher Harris Named Editor-in-Chief of Southeast Kentucky Magazine | New https://didgeridoomagazin.com/christopher-harris-named-editor-in-chief-of-southeast-kentucky-magazine-new/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 04:11:25 +0000 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/christopher-harris-named-editor-in-chief-of-southeast-kentucky-magazine-new/ Longtime Commonwealth Journal editor Christopher Harris has been named editor of the CJ’s Southeast Kentucky monthly magazine. Harris will also oversee other magazine publications, including summer travel guides like Discover Lake Cumberland and Stay & Play, and Unsung Heroes, which recognizes community officials. A 1998 graduate of Somerset High School and a 2002 alumnus of […]]]>

Longtime Commonwealth Journal editor Christopher Harris has been named editor of the CJ’s Southeast Kentucky monthly magazine.

Harris will also oversee other magazine publications, including summer travel guides like Discover Lake Cumberland and Stay & Play, and Unsung Heroes, which recognizes community officials.

A 1998 graduate of Somerset High School and a 2002 alumnus of the University of the Arts, Harris worked for the Commonwealth Journal in some capacity for 19 years, starting as a sports stringer in 2003. He became a member of the Hall of CJ Press in 2004, and during that time he worked in a variety of roles including journalist, columnist, photographer, page designer, and entertainment content editor, winning 29 different awards as part of of Excellence in Kentucky Newspapers from the Kentucky Press Association over the years.

“Chris (Harris) has always been a huge contributor to our monthly CJ magazines,” said Commonwealth Journal editor Steve Cornelius. “Chris is an exceptional writer, and he has immense knowledge of many of the topics we cover in our magazines, so it was a perfect fit for him to serve as editor of our Southeast Kentucky magazine.”

In her new role, Harris will organize the planning and production of creative content for the magazines and work to ensure the finished work is an engaging, informative and entertaining publication that instantly captures readers’ interest.

“I’ve always felt that CJ staffers have done some of their most memorable work on our magazines,” Harris said. “Writing for a newspaper requires a certain rigidity of style, even with feature articles, but our editors have been able to spread their wings a bit in magazines and create something fresh and inspired.”

You can contact him at charris@somerset-kentucky.com.

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HC upholds conviction of magazine publisher for publishing defamatory article against IAS officer 22 years ago https://didgeridoomagazin.com/hc-upholds-conviction-of-magazine-publisher-for-publishing-defamatory-article-against-ias-officer-22-years-ago/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 15:19:00 +0000 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/hc-upholds-conviction-of-magazine-publisher-for-publishing-defamatory-article-against-ias-officer-22-years-ago/ BA Harish Gowda, then director of PU Education and CET Cell, filed a complaint in 2000 while on duty BA Harish Gowda, then director of PU Education and CET Cell, filed a complaint in 2000 while on duty The Karnataka High Court upheld the conviction and sentence of a magazine publisher for publishing a defamatory […]]]>

BA Harish Gowda, then director of PU Education and CET Cell, filed a complaint in 2000 while on duty

BA Harish Gowda, then director of PU Education and CET Cell, filed a complaint in 2000 while on duty

The Karnataka High Court upheld the conviction and sentence of a magazine publisher for publishing a defamatory article 22 years ago against BA Harish Gowda, then Director of the Department of Pre-University Education and Cell THIS.

Judge HP Sandesh passed the order while denying a motion filed by Ravi Kumar, editor, printer, publisher and journalist of Parivala Patrike.

Sentencing Ravi Kumar under Sections 499 and 500 of the Indian Penal Code, the Magistrate Court had sentenced him to six months in jail and fined ₹10,000.

Mr Gowda, a retired IAS officer, had made the complaint in 2000 while on duty.

Refusing to intervene in the conviction and sentence, the High Court said no fault could be found with the orders of the trial courts when the publisher had “produced no evidence before the trial court to support his assertion that the article had been published in good and due form”. faith and for the public good”.

The High Court also noted that the convict had produced no evidence in support of the article in which certain imputations were made against Mr Gowda.

The trial courts, in passing sentence, had taken note of enormous hardship, suffering, mental suffering and financial loss over a very long period of almost 17 years caused to the plaintiff to establish that false statements had been made against him in the article, says the High Court.

Although the High Court was of the view that the editor’s sentence was less severe for defaming the then-serving IAS officer, it rejected Mr Gowda’s request for a higher sentence.

Citing various Supreme Court verdicts and provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure, the High Court said there was no provision in Cr. CP which allows the victim/complainant to file an appeal requesting an improvement of the sentence because only the State has such a right.

However, the High Court said the Union Government should consider amending Cr. PC to allow complainants/victims to also file an appeal requesting an improvement in sentence.

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Arlene Johns, editor of Johnstown Magazine, is retiring https://didgeridoomagazin.com/arlene-johns-editor-of-johnstown-magazine-is-retiring/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 11:53:00 +0000 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/arlene-johns-editor-of-johnstown-magazine-is-retiring/ Jun.2 – Arlene Johns’ life was at a crossroads when she saw a job posting for a Tribune Democrat telemarketer in 1989. She was a struggling single mother with two young children and no experience in marketing — let alone print media. But like a tenacious journalist in search of a story, she called the […]]]>

Jun.2 – Arlene Johns’ life was at a crossroads when she saw a job posting for a Tribune Democrat telemarketer in 1989.

She was a struggling single mother with two young children and no experience in marketing — let alone print media.

But like a tenacious journalist in search of a story, she called the human resources department day after day.

“I kept saying, ‘Just give me a week’s work,'” Johns said. “’I’m going to prove myself.’ “

Over the next 33 years, Johns would end up doing this in almost every corner of The Tribune-Democrat building in downtown Johnstown.

Over the years, she worked her way through the newsroom and rose through the ranks of the department – becoming archivist, press assistant and eventually city editor before taking the reins as editor of the Johnstown magazine in 2013.

“When I started, I didn’t have a journalism background,” Johns said Wednesday, “but every time I changed jobs, I learned something different. How to write a story, how to put in page a newspaper and work with staff to ensure the next edition is the best it can be.

“Every move I’ve made has led to something else – and I see the hand of God involved in that to prepare me for this day,” she added, “because at the time…I didn’t never imagined that I would be the editor of a magazine.”

Johns is ending that career next month. Woman Nanty Glo is retiring from business on July 1.

“At the service of readers”

But Johns said she has no plans to slow down — or stop shining a spotlight on the community.

“I really came to love Johnstown,” the Indiana County native said. “It may be partly my love for underdogs, but this city has taken so many beatings over the years and has always found a way to bounce back, and I see that happening today thanks to the incredible efforts of so many people in our community.”

Tribune-Democrat editor Chip Minemyer said Johns’ commitment to her work and the community was what made her a strong leader throughout her career.

“Arlene has been a dedicated and passionate journalist in the Johnstown area for many years, serving readers in various capacities – as writer, editor, manager,” Minemyer said. “She has been a leader in some of our most important work – including books to capture the beautiful architecture of our local churches and to honor the history of the passengers and crew of Flight 93.”

Minemyer said efforts were underway to find the magazine’s next editor. But Johns’ signature will likely continue to appear in its glossy pages from time to time.

Editor Robert Forcey credited Johns for his ability to capture and add to the “local flavor” of the community through monthly publishing.

“Through Johnstown Magazine, Arlene has kept our community focused on the most positive stories from our neighbors and our community while continuing to add local flavor to our town,” Forcey said. “Arlene will surely be missed as we move forward, but she has already volunteered to help us with some of her favorite projects, so we will always have her help as we enter a new era for Johnstown Magazine.”

“It was an honor”

Johns was in the newsroom during The Tribune-Democrat’s coverage of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

She cited those uncertain and heartbreaking days as among her most memorable.

That morning began with blue skies over Johnstown, an attack on the World Trade Center and calls for an unfounded bomb threat at Johnstown Airport, she recalls.

It turned out that airport staff and nearby military personnel were all trying to make sure the location was ready for the possibility that United Airlines Flight 93 might fly over or land there. .

By the time the world learned that the plane had crashed into a reclaimed strip mine near Shanksville, Johns was directing reporters to the scene and finding ways to document the shocked community’s response.

“Interviewing the families (of Flight 93 passengers and crew) is something I will never forget,” she said, “because for most people it was a global event. For them, it was personal – and it was an honor to tell their stories.”

Listening to heartfelt stories from everyday people, including breast cancer survivors, was also an unforgettable experience, she said.

As a magazine editor, Johns cited a two-part story with Joyce Murtha – the wife of the late U.S. Representative John Murtha – and special covers re-enacting unforgettable Hollywood scenes among his career highlights.

A scene featuring WJAC-TV’s Tim Rigby and current Cambria Regional Chamber Speaker Amy Bradley paying tribute to “It’s a Wonderful Life” is a favorite. A nod to “A Christmas Story” also ranks among the most memorable.

“Being editor-in-chief has been a privilege,” she said, “and I hope I have had an impact through the magazine.”

Johns and her husband, Joe, live in the Nanty Glo area.

But she said she wanted to stay a part of Johnstown by finding new ways to promote positive events in the area.

She hopes she can move from telling these stories as an editor and writer to being part of the effort on a “hands-on” level.

“I told Carlynn Toth I was going to be there helping her clean up Central Park,” she said of the Ogletown woman who has volunteered time over the past decade to beautify the town square. “If I could be an ambassador who walked around talking about Johnstown and pulling weeds all day, I would.

“Whether it’s volunteering or part-time work in the city,” she said, “I just want to get involved.”

David Hurst is a reporter for The Tribune-Democrat. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @TDDavidHurst.

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Interview with Damien Linnane, editor of Paper Chained magazine https://didgeridoomagazin.com/interview-with-damien-linnane-editor-of-paper-chained-magazine/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 01:02:59 +0000 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/interview-with-damien-linnane-editor-of-paper-chained-magazine/ American professor Angela Davis remarked in an interview with Democracy Now last December that she was “absolutely surprised” that the concept of prison abolition had “entered public discourse during this time”. Davis, a key abolitionist, and her colleagues did not expect the campaign, which calls on societies to dismantle incarceration systems, to enter the popular […]]]>

American professor Angela Davis remarked in an interview with Democracy Now last December that she was “absolutely surprised” that the concept of prison abolition had “entered public discourse during this time”.

Davis, a key abolitionist, and her colleagues did not expect the campaign, which calls on societies to dismantle incarceration systems, to enter the popular consciousness for “maybe 50 years” because, until to recently, it was a fringe to publish.

However, footage of George Floyd being killed by Minneapolis police officers and the resulting upsurge of the Black Lives Matter movement has dramatically changed the situation, calling into question the role corrections and law enforcement play in our systems becoming mainstream.

And with that, so does the understanding that abolishing prisons doesn’t just mean tearing down the walls and letting everyone go wild. Rather, it involves the implementation of broad social reforms that lead to a more equitable society, with the perceived need for prisons and imprisonment diminished.

Creative pursuit has long been understood as a way to transform negative emotions, and in this way, not only does the quarterly magazine Paper Chained, a prisoner-for-prisoner publication, help inmates reform individually, but, more broadly , it is abolitionist in nature.

A newspaper of expression behind bars

First launched in 2017, Paper Chained is a magazine that appears online and in print and features the writings of inmates, ex-inmates, family members, or corrections-related work. Printed magazines are displayed free for prisoners inside.

The sixth edition of Paper Chained has just been put online. Indeed, the first article in the new addition is titled A Future Without Prisons and posits that “if we maintain our current course, the future of prisons is an ever-expanding series of storage facilities for broken people.”

The author, Stacey Stokes, goes on to explain that moving towards a society without incarceration would require exploring the reasons for the behavior that leads to imprisonment, and providing healing and education to help move beyond that.

“A future without prisons is a world where we all have a place and no one is left behind,” Stokes concludes.

The creative outlet

The majority of Paper Chained’s funding comes from the Community Restorative Centre, a Sydney-based organization that provides a range of services to people involved in the criminal justice system and their families.

Damien Linnane is the editor of Paper Chained. Having spent time in prison himself and penned the novel Scarred, Linnane understands the importance a creative outlet can have for those inside.

So when he was asked to take over the reins of the publication, he had to accept.

Sydney Criminal Lawyers spoke to Damien Linnane, editor of Paper Chained, about the magazine’s impact on those involved, the prison’s new computer tablet program which will allow inmates to access the publication online and what they are looking for in terms of content.

Damien Linnane, editor of Paper Chained

Damien, since last May, you’ve been the editor of Paper Chained. Why would you say a magazine made by prisoners for prisoners is important?

What makes my work most interesting are the reactions I get in the letters from prisoners.

People often tell me how much of a difference just getting mail can make in their day, which I know very well from personal experience.

But what I hear the most is how much of a difference it makes to know there’s a publication that specifically gives them a voice, understands what they’re going through, and speaks directly to them.

Paper Chained is what I needed when I was in prison. I had so much I wanted to express, but there was no way for me to share everything I had created with the world. My artwork and writing just gathered in a box under my bed.

How would you describe the types of articles and other artistic expression you received for the issues? How would you say the topics covered reflect the experience of the prisoners?

The majority of submissions we receive are poetry: that definitely seems to be the preferred way people like to express themselves.

Unsurprisingly, most of them are heavily prison-focused. I have certainly read a lot of books on the themes of feeling trapped, despair and regret.

So it’s healthy for people to have a creative outlet to express those feelings, rather than just locking them away.

But we receive all types of writing. In our last issue, we received an article from an inmate who simply wanted to share his passion for reading.

He wrote about how reading makes him feel free, which I can personally attest to. The only time I didn’t feel like I was in prison was when I was reading or writing.

Unfortunately, we’re a bit limited in terms of the art we can receive from prison, as that’s about all people can put in an envelope.

It is very difficult to get larger artworks sent, and even more difficult to try to get pictures of artworks taken.

Fortunately, we have a relationship with Boom Gate Gallery, the art gallery attached to Long Bay, and they can give us access to photographs of larger works of art made by incarcerated people.

Corrective Services NSW has agreed to make Paper Chained available to inmates via the new tablet computers which are provided to inmates. This was an initiative presented to the government agency by the Community Justice Coalition.

As someone who has spent time indoors, how important is this tablet computing initiative to you?

I spent the first half of my sentence writing a detective story by hand, and the second half learning to draw.

I originally wanted to go back to college, but we didn’t have access to a computer and the days of offline correspondence courses were long gone, so I had no way to study anything. .

I was told that because I had been assessed as low risk for reoffending and because resources were limited, I was not eligible for in-person rehab, and I was also told that it there was no therapy available.

The most frustrating thing about prison is that you have all the time in the world, but prison doesn’t give you the resources to do anything constructive during that time.

I was lucky enough to be literate enough to write a novel, but a lot of people in prison aren’t so lucky.

One of the reasons we campaigned for computers in cells for so long was so that inmates could access rehabilitation classes, even after lockdown and during lockdown.

Even being able to access basic education programs from your cell will make a huge difference for people who want to change in prison.

Only 22.7% of inmates in NSW were able to study in 2019-20 – the second lowest state rate after Tasmania – and just 0.1% were able to pursue higher education.

These results have been consistent over the past few years, but hopefully we’ll start to see a difference now that tablets have finally been introduced.

Image of the cover of the sixth edition of Paper Chained. Artwork by N21

Justice Action had been pushing for the tablets for a long time. The campaign was intensified after the onset of COVID-19 due to the impact it had on prison conditions.

Prisoners in this country have had a difficult time during the pandemic due to neglect and restrictions. What do you think of the situation of detainees during the COVID crisis?

I can only imagine how much harder prison has become for people during the pandemic. Considering how isolating and depressing it was before, I know it would have been so much worse.

It’s kind of ironic, I get about 25 letters from people in prison a week, but one thing I’ve noticed is that people very rarely want to communicate about prison itself or how things affect them personally, other than through art and poetry.

Writing, art, reading and education in prison is a form of escape from what is really going on around you, so anything that helps facilitate this will be welcome.

When you’re in lockdown, you normally can’t even access books in the library. I really think prison tablets are a fantastic idea, long overdue.

Paper Chained is primarily funded by the Community Restorative Centre. Why did this organization prioritize such a project?

I’ve helped Paper Chained on the periphery since their inception in 2017. And in 2021, the previous editor asked me if I wanted to take over because she no longer had the time or money to self-fund the project.

Knowing how much something like Paper Chained would have improved my mental health when I was in prison, I couldn’t say no.

But as our subscriber list grew dramatically, it became clear that I had bitten off more than I could chew.

I received enough contributions to publish it much more often than once a year, which is how the magazine operated for its first five years, although answering letters and transcribing contributions took up most of my free time. .

Then, at the beginning of this year, I ended a long-term employment contract as an archivist. And since I needed a new job anyway, I applied for funding to turn what I was passionate about into my dream job, and luckily I managed to get a 12 month contract with CRC to produce the quarterly magazine.

It really fitted in with their other big projects, like Jailbreak Radio, a radio show for incarcerated people, and Songbirds, which records music made in prison.

And finally, Damien, for those who would like to contribute or get involved in Paper Chained, what should they do?

I really encourage people to try. A lot of people seem embarrassed about whether their work is good enough, and then I marvel at their creativity.

From experience, many writers and artists doubt themselves too much, especially when they start for the first time.

If you are concerned about using your real name, we may publish your work anonymously. And keep in mind that if you’re looking to pursue a career in writing or art, being published by us already could give you a helping hand.

People often write to us asking if we accept certain types of contributions, such as song lyrics. And like I always tell them, if you can create it, we’ll consider printing it.

It’s really only limited by your imagination.

One thing I wish we had more of is fiction, especially since that’s what I created when I was incarcerated. I would love to see more short stories in future issues.

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Stoney Burns: From Hillcrest Student to Music Magazine Editor https://didgeridoomagazin.com/stoney-burns-from-hillcrest-student-to-music-magazine-editor/ Tue, 31 May 2022 19:11:23 +0000 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/stoney-burns-from-hillcrest-student-to-music-magazine-editor/ Stoney Burns and Kris Kristofferson Brent Stein was born on December 4, 1942 in Dallas. Her father, Roy, owned a commercial printing company called the Allied Printing Co. And her mother, Esther, stayed home. Stein had a sister, who was three years younger. The Steins, a middle-class family, lived in North Dallas. Brent graduated from […]]]>

Stoney Burns and Kris Kristofferson

Brent Stein was born on December 4, 1942 in Dallas. Her father, Roy, owned a commercial printing company called the Allied Printing Co. And her mother, Esther, stayed home. Stein had a sister, who was three years younger.

The Steins, a middle-class family, lived in North Dallas. Brent graduated from Hillcrest High School in 1960, then attended the University of Oklahoma for two years, spent a summer at Arlington State University, then transferred to the University of Arizona in Tucson. He joined Sigma Alpha Mu, which began as a Jewish fraternity, and in 1964 graduated with a degree in marketing and advertising.

When he returned to Dallas, Stein spent a year at a radio station selling commercials. Then he started working for his father’s printing company, which was the largest of its kind in Dallas at the time.

Towards the end of the 1960s, he discovered Subway Notes: SMU’s Free Off-Campus Press. It was published by students at SMU, where Stein was an advisor to Sigma Alpha Mu.

Friends magazine 1980

Stein thought Remarks could use a facelift, and he volunteered to help with the graphic design. He started using the name Stoney Burns to avoid embarrassing his family or clients, and eventually that’s what almost everyone called him. He added white space and an eye-catching cover to the pages, and he created a new logo.

For one issue, Burns wrote the cover story, “Cops Start Anti-Love Campaign!”, took the photos and arranged them in a collage surrounded by hippie art.

He also started a column in the newspaper, “Underground Undercurrents”.

As he worked with Remarks, he let his hair grow to his shoulders and his father fired him. Burns therefore focused much more on publishing. In 1967, he had taken over as editor. The founder of Remarks, Doug Baker, was the son of a man who worked for Clint Murchison Jr., founder of the Dallas Cowboys. Murchison told Baker’s father that Baker had to end his association with the publication.

Friends Magazine 1978

After Burns took office, SMU President Willis M. Tate demanded that the publication remove any mention of the university from its title and expelled her from campus.

Remarks was anti-war, anti-racist, advocated hallucinogenic drugs, and provided information on birth control and abortions.

While running the publication, Burns was repeatedly arrested and beaten, his tires were slashed, his car was shot, and the office was vandalized.

In mid-September 1970, Burns left Remarks. He sold 999 shares to the Fort Worth White Panthers for a marijuana cigarette, which they smoked to seal the deal.

Then he worked for a month at Lone Star Expedition in Austin before returning to Dallas to work with Baker at an alternative newspaper Dallas Newsof which he was the artistic director, sold advertisements and wrote a gossip column. The New was renamed Iconoclast.

Burns decided to run for Dallas County Sheriff in 1972, and within a month of his announcement he was arrested for possession of a small amount of marijuana. He was sentenced to 10 years and a day in prison, and pending the outcome of the appeal against his sentence, he left the Iconoclast and started Buddya music magazine named after Buddy Holly.

He spent a month in Huntsville Jail in 1974 before the governor commuted his sentence.

Two years later, he hires Kirby Warnock, who has just moved to Dallas. There was no interview; Burns just wanted to know if he could sell advertising.

“It was the funniest time I’ve ever had and the craziest time I’ve ever had,” Warnock says.

Although he was hired for a sales position, Warnock primarily wrote articles and took pictures for the magazine during his eight years there. As an editor, Burns was a stickler for grammar.

Their office was on McKinney Avenue near Lemmon Avenue, in two adjoining units of an apartment building. It was cheap, Warnock said.

Burns died in April 2011.

“He was a great guy to be around,” Warnock said. “We just had a lot of fun. That’s what I remember is having fun.

Source: “Stoney Burns and ‘Dallas Notes’: Covering the Dallas Counterculture, 1967-1970” by Bonnie Alice Lovell


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Magazine publisher | Media professions https://didgeridoomagazin.com/magazine-publisher-media-professions/ Mon, 23 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/magazine-publisher-media-professions/ Sector Select…Academic (1)Broadcast (8)Charity/NGO (2)Communications (8)Journals (36)Newspapers (37)Newswires (27)Online (48)Public relations (6)Public sector (2)Research (12) Job category Select…art and design (2)audiovisual journalists (9)editors (9)editorial assistants / interns (11)editors and management (23)features (48)freelancer (3)internships (1)media sales (1)new media (45)news (49)image seekers (2)production and sub-editors (7)proofreaders (2)public relations (8)section editors (15)social media (49)specialist writers (38) […]]]>






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QNews is growing! Vacancy: Editor-in-chief of the magazine https://didgeridoomagazin.com/qnews-is-growing-vacancy-editor-in-chief-of-the-magazine/ Sun, 22 May 2022 23:15:44 +0000 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/qnews-is-growing-vacancy-editor-in-chief-of-the-magazine/ QNews is expanding and, due to this expansion, now wants to hire a part-time editor. The magazine editor will join our existing editorial team. Online editor Jordan Hirst began QNews in 2012, followed by designer Amsnel Gorgonio in 2015. Entertainment editor Michael James joined the team in 2016, then current editor of Destiny Rogers magazine […]]]>

QNews is expanding and, due to this expansion, now wants to hire a part-time editor.

The magazine editor will join our existing editorial team. Online editor Jordan Hirst began QNews in 2012, followed by designer Amsnel Gorgonio in 2015. Entertainment editor Michael James joined the team in 2016, then current editor of Destiny Rogers magazine the following year. Earlier this month, the addition of Sarah Davison from South Australia broadened the platform’s national perspective.

QNews editor Richard Bakker said the publication’s expansion plans included a commitment to reflect the diversity of LGBTIQ+ communities.

“One of the great strengths of our communities is its diversity. QNews embraces diversity and inclusion.

“We are proud of our existing editorial and writing team. Jordan, Amsnel, Michael and Destiny have all been with us for many years and continue to make us proud. We were also fortunate to have Sarah on the team recently. And we remain eternally grateful to the many wonderful contributors who power both our print and online offerings.

Part-time magazine editor

QNews needs a part-time magazine editor to work from its office in Holland Park, South Brisbane.

QNews Magazine is a print and online publication serving LGBTIQ+ communities in Queensland and beyond.

The editor’s responsibilities include planning, managing and producing the monthly QNews magazine. They will create content, develop story ideas and also liaise with our other editors and contributors to ensure that each monthly magazine provides readers with an informative and entertaining reading experience.

The Magazine Editor will possess exceptional writing, editing and creative skills. QNews the editorial policy emphasizes readability measures and SEO optimization. (Magazine articles are also published online.)

Editor’s Responsibilities

  • Generate story ideas
  • Liaise with editorial staff, designer and contributors
  • Approve the content, appearance and layout of submitted articles.
  • Liaise with writers and designer to discuss features, layouts and artwork.
  • Comply with media law and industry regulations.
  • Regularly send briefs to writers that include deadlines and writing style.
  • Proofread, edit and rewrite articles to meet publishing standards.
  • Help staff meet deadlines.

Richard Bakker said: “Our current team can attest that QNews is a fun and friendly place to work with a strong team ethic based on cooperation and a commitment to advancing our LGBTIQ+ communities.

“We look forward to adding another member to this team.”

Apps

Applications close June 10, 2022. Please send a 300 word sample + cover letter and CV to apply@qnews.com.au

For the latest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) news in Australia, visit qnews.com.au. Consult our latest magazines or find us on Facebook, TwitterInstagram and YouTube.

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Tamil Magazine Editor S. Gurumurthy ‘Pressurised’ to Take RBI Board Membership https://didgeridoomagazin.com/tamil-magazine-editor-s-gurumurthy-pressurised-to-take-rbi-board-membership/ Tue, 17 May 2022 07:23:00 +0000 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/tamil-magazine-editor-s-gurumurthy-pressurised-to-take-rbi-board-membership/ A chartered accountant and editor of Tamil political magazine ‘Thuglak’ S. Gurumurthy said he was pressured to take up the board position in the Reserve Bank of India (RBI). Gurumurthy said so in an email to the Secretary General of the Indian Association of Bank Employees (AIBEA) CH Venkatachalam and also dared the latter to […]]]>
A chartered accountant and editor of Tamil political magazine ‘Thuglak’ S. Gurumurthy said he was pressured to take up the board position in the Reserve Bank of India (RBI).



Gurumurthy said so in an email to the Secretary General of the Indian Association of Bank Employees (AIBEA) CH Venkatachalam and also dared the latter to share the mail with the union members.

As a postscript to his email, Gurumurthy told Venkatachalam, “You all think that me being in the RBI Council is a big thing. I was pressured to take on this position as there were not many people to give a contrary opinion to the RBI board.”

“I didn’t need it and I didn’t seek it. For decades I had never held a position in government or with government. I never will either.”

“I on the RBI board have been criticized by Western financial media, and I am glad that you, a communist, now share their views,” Gurumurthy added.

Continue further. Gurumurthy said he never allowed anyone in any public forum to state that he was on the RBI board in introductory remarks.

“You have expressed serious concerns about my presence on the RBI Board. You may not be aware that if I am not on the RBI Board it makes very little difference to me “said Gurumurthy.

Gurumurthy wrote to Venkatachalam in response to the latter’s social media post condemning him for his comments during Thuglak magazine’s annual feature on public sector bankers.

Speaking at Thuglak magazine’s annual ceremony, Gurumurthy said public sector banks were losing talented civil servants to the private sector due to low salaries and lack of freedom.

“There are only scum and garbage left in the public sector banks and with them the country needs to be globally competitive in the financial sector,” he said.

Gurumurthy also said that until the government has a majority stake in its banks, it is not possible to encourage talented staff.

Reacting to this, Venkatachalam said, “We strongly condemn his unwarranted comments and demand his immediate apology. He is unfit to serve on the RBI board and the government should remove him from this important position.”

Gurumurthy in his email to Venkatachalam said, “I wouldn’t have written if I hadn’t known you and you hadn’t invited me to the AIBEA workshop. Your post started a campaign against me.”

Stating that many campaigns were made against him earlier, Gurumurthy said, “I never cared about campaigns against me by anyone, as I do not belong to any party, nor do I seek or have need the courtesy of anyone, by the grace of the Divine, I believe, so it’s not to respond to any campaign.

“I have always opposed and will continue to oppose privatization because I believe that with all the flaws, the majority of banking assets in India must be in the hands of the state. The Indian economy will be ruined if most of the financial sector falls into private hands with the expansion and contraction of the Rupee depends on the dollar,” Gurumurthy said.

“I resisted within RBI all efforts to pressure the government to privatize when former RBI governors were in charge,” he added.

Regarding his speech at the Thuglak magazine function, Gurumurthy said that the UPA government’s policies of leaving huge FII investments in the stock market has led to indigestible money in the system.

To lend this money, the government lowered tariffs to zero for capital goods in order to encourage industrialists to borrow from banks.

Gurumurthy said the government had persuaded the industry to undertake huge expansions in the hope that India would transform into a high-growth, export-driven economy.

According to Gurumurthy, the ensuing huge recession 2008-09 caused many hundreds of thousands of crore to be invested and loaned funds, NPA (non-performing asset) and which was also later accepted by the former governor of RBI Raghuram Rajan.

“This is where the woes of the PSBs (public sector banks) began. Not a single political party, including the BJP and CPI-M or the banking unions, has told the truth about the source of the problems of the NPA. Guilty officials in the Ministry of Finance who run telbanking have been confused with the UPA and NDA governments, to suppress the truth,” Gurumurthy said.

Continuing further, he said that the issue of the NPA, the action against it by the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI), Central Vigilance Commission (CVC), prudential standards has completely shaken the officers of the bank.

“It gave a huge opportunity to banks and private funds which had their peak because the best loan accounts were transferred to them. They started offering high salaries and attracting competent officers from the PSB,” said Gurumurthy.

As a result, several competent officials left the PSBs and he had referred to the remaining officials as “kazhisadai”, which means that the remains or those who could not pass through the filter, remained inside.

“It’s a fact and I stand by it,” Gurumurthy said.

Referring to the declining share of PSB loans in total banking sector loans, Gurumurthy said: “At this rate, PSBs do not need to be privatized. that government and municipal accounts and all corporate accounts will be taken care of by private banks The fact that we do not have and are not generating and training the necessary talent in PSOs to manage 60% of the National savings that go into PSOs is indisputable. It’s a matter of concern for everyone, including the government,” he said.

“If you are a responsible trade unionist you will be worried, talk about it and do not play politics. I wrote this because you invited me to speak at the AIBEA and you know that our points of view converge on PSBs in many ways,” Gurumurthy told Venkatachalam. and also asked if he had the courage to circulate his mail to AIBEA members.

“I won’t make this public unless you do. If you do, have the courage to publish it in full,” Gurumurthy said.

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Matthew Drummond, Editor of Fin Magazine, talks about AFR’s new title https://didgeridoomagazin.com/matthew-drummond-editor-of-fin-magazine-talks-about-afrs-new-title/ Thu, 12 May 2022 19:02:02 +0000 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/matthew-drummond-editor-of-fin-magazine-talks-about-afrs-new-title/ Share Tweeter Share E-mail This morning the Australian Financial Review will lift the veil on the first issue of its new glossy lifestyle publication, End Magazine. Inserted quarterly in the Financial analysis newspaper, End Magazine will inspire readers with the best in fashion, design, watches, jewelry, automotive, art and travel. The magazine was officially launched […]]]>

This morning the Australian Financial Review will lift the veil on the first issue of its new glossy lifestyle publication, End Magazine. Inserted quarterly in the Financial analysis newspaper, End Magazine will inspire readers with the best in fashion, design, watches, jewelry, automotive, art and travel.

The magazine was officially launched last night at an event at Sydney’s Centennial Hotel which saw Nine client director, luxury & travel, Amanda Upton and End Magazine editor Matthew Drummond speak on behalf of the team that put the post together, thanking everyone for their hard work and trust in the title.

Media week spoke to Matthew Drummond on the launch End Magazine and what readers can expect.

After the FRG pressed a pause on titles like sophisticated traveler and Luxury due to pandemic constraints, Drummond says the space left has given the team the opportunity to test other ideas.

“During the pandemic, we continued to publish AFR Magazine every month as usual, and we also experienced shiny editions of Life & Leisurewhich is our weekly lifestyle supplement. Experience the shiny editions of Life & Leisure for about a year and a half gave us a real idea of ​​how far we could push thisand if there was an appetite for a new glossy lifestyle magazine.

“The pause in quarterly titles at the start of the pandemic meant there was room for a new lifestyle title in the Financial analysisbecause while AFR Magazine has good support from luxury advertisers, it’s not a pure lifestyle title.

As well as editing End MagazineDrummond editions AFR Magazine. Although the two titles complement each other, they are also very different entities.

AFR Magazine is the home of Financial analysis Rich List, the Young Rich List, the Power Lists, the Philanthropy 50 list. End Magazine is a pure lifestyle title – it’s softer, it’s more visual, it’s easier to read.

“There are elements of possible overlap. We do two fashion issues a year at AFR Magazinebut even when we do fashion, we always look for companies at the top of the luxury fashion industry. If success is the safeguard for AFR Magazinethen style is the safeguard for End Magazine.”

Among other lifestyle headlines, Drummond says that End Magazine has one particular advantage that sets it apart from the crowd: a connection with the audience of the Financial analysis.

“It connects to an audience that is unrivaled in terms of scale and wealthy households. You won’t find another fashion or style title that has access to the same caliber of audience as End Magazine Is.

This audience continues to grow, with the title of sister AFR Magazine an example of what can happen.

“One of the strengths of AFR Magazine has been how we market the print product to the growing digital subscriber base of the Financial analysis. Roy Morgan shows that AFR Magazine print readership is up about 50% year-on-year to 450,000 readers. It is an achievement of which we are very proud. »

The cover of the first issue features Kirsha Kaechele – artist, curator and wife of the founder of MONA David Walch – wearing a Comme des Garçons skirt as she stepped out of a 1960s ‘Futuro Pod’.

“She actually wasn’t Plan A for the cover,” says Drummond. “Plan A for the cover was Mark Newson and Charlotte Stockdale. We went to Greece to see their vacation home on the island of Ithaca, we had a great photo shoot, it looked great on the cover – but I kept coming back to the pictures we had of Kirsha in this Comme des Garcons skirt that came out of this 1960s Futuro Pod.

“It’s the mood of the magazine that we want to create: it’s fun, it’s irreverent, it’s very catchy. This may not be what you expect from Financial analysis.”

Sometimes an image is more than just an image, and for Drummond, this was one of those times.

“I feel really humbled. We gave her concepts of how we want to do things, and she really shaped this cover. I think we have an artist’s mark on our cover, which is pretty exciting.”

The all-new magazine brings with it a whole new set of business opportunities. Drummond says the team has a new page and the ability to shape the title in a way that will suit the market in 2022 and beyond.

“We will be open to doing sponsored content in End Magazineit would probably fit as a title that will connect with luxury brands around events.

“Commercially, it works like a very good brother for AFR Magazineproviding advertisers with a more visual, relaxed and light-hearted environment in which to appear. »

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Carl A. Swanson Named Editor-in-Chief of TRAINS Magazine https://didgeridoomagazin.com/carl-a-swanson-named-editor-in-chief-of-trains-magazine/ Wed, 11 May 2022 13:08:24 +0000 https://didgeridoomagazin.com/carl-a-swanson-named-editor-in-chief-of-trains-magazine/ Trains Editor Carl A. Swanson WAUKESHA, Wis. – Kalmbach Media Co. has named veteran railroad editor and journalist Carl A. Swanson as the new editor of TRAINS, the nation’s most widely circulated railroad industry magazine. Swanson succeeds the late Jim Wrinn, who died March 30, 2022, and served as editor for more than 17 years. […]]]>
Trains Editor Carl A. Swanson

WAUKESHA, Wis. – Kalmbach Media Co. has named veteran railroad editor and journalist Carl A. Swanson as the new editor of TRAINS, the nation’s most widely circulated railroad industry magazine.

Swanson succeeds the late Jim Wrinn, who died March 30, 2022, and served as editor for more than 17 years. Kalmbach has published TRAINS monthly since its foundation in November 1940.

Swanson joins the TRAINS team from MODEL RAILROADER, where he has been editor for the past three years. Previously, he ran the CLASSIC TOY TRAINS in Kalmbach for 13 years. He is now relishing the opportunity to run what is called the railroad magazine.

“No industry has a richer history or more vibrant future than railroading, and no one covers it better than Trains,” Swanson says. “As a lifelong rail enthusiast and an avid reader of the magazine, I am thrilled and humbled by this opportunity to continue TRAINS’ tradition of excellence in informing, satisfying and serving our customers. “

Originally from Nebraska, Swanson was a reporter for the Norfolk (Neb.) Daily News before embarking on his career as a railroad reporter. Swanson was editor of Pentrex Publishing’s Passenger Train Journal and Rail News magazines before joining Kalmbach in 1997 as associate editor of CLASSIC TOY TRAINS. He moved to TRAINS magazine as Associate Editor in 1999, then promoted to Editor-in-Chief of MODEL RAILROADER in 2002.

Someone familiar with Swanson’s work from his previous tenure at TRAINS is current acting editor Kevin P. Keefe, who served as the magazine’s editor in the 1990s and later served as its editor before his retired as editorial vice president of Kalmbach in 2016. .

“Carl has many railroad interests,” says Keefe. “During his first stint at TRAINS, he did a great job of recognizing what readers want, and now he will do the same in the highest position. Add to that his superb writing skills and you have someone one that will more than live up to the traditions of the position.

Swanson is also the author of ‘Faces of Railroading’, a deluxe pictorial tribute to railroad people, published by Kalmbach Books in 2004. He also edited the second edition of Kalmbach’s ‘Command Control for Toy Trains’.

A graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the Woodland School of Photography, Swanson enjoys exploring and writing about local history and has authored two books for The History Press, “Lost Milwaukee” in 2018 and the recent ” Historic Crimes of Milwaukee”. “He blogs regularly at www.milwaukeenotebook.com.

Swanson lives in Milwaukee with his wife, Judith. The couple have three adult children.

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